bateries at cost

Giles

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Feb 25, 2014
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Hi all,,,one of our purchasing guys (who is an idiot) has accidentaly ordered £500k of product we didn`t need. We have in this around 1400 batteries for Landcruisers, so we are selling for cost. They are very high quality and are made by Hyundai (Koreans make the best batteries)

You guys can have them for £50 each delivered if you call the office and say Giles said,,,or you can buy off ebay but they are £51.95 on there

There are two batteries on landcruisers 334 and 335 (they are oposit way round)

here is a link

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Size-334-...273?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item3aae5e8171
 

StarCruiser

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Oct 7, 2014
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What would be the shelf life on these Giles?

Just thinking how long they would last in the garage without deterioration.
 
Last edited:

Giles

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Feb 25, 2014
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hi there

theyhavea 4 year garantee so as long as you charge every 6 weeks and don`t store on a concrete floor they would be fine to store for that long,,but I would say fit within 6 months, they are desigened to last 6 years

sorry for anyone that dosen`t know I am from Batterymegastore.co.uk
 
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Chris

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I have bought quite a few batteries from BMS and the service has been first class. Normal every day batteries, big batteries and several Optimas. Best prices I could find anywhere. Next day delivery.
 

Giles

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Feb 25, 2014
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thanks Chris

Concrete is negativly charged and batteries are positivly charged,,and i think the physics is basically everything tries to be neutral so they cancel each other out,,,sorry if i have offended any inteligent people out there with my shit explination

We import Optima directly from the Factory in Mexico and I think we are the only firm in the UK to do that,,but becarefful with Optima and any other AGM battery,,they don`t like heat so don`t put to close to engines as the little moisture in then will dry out and cause failure.

Giles
 

Chris

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I will be 'insulating' my stored batteries first chance I get. They are on concrete but do get a regular charge from the CTEK and seem OK, but they will be standing on bubble wrap or what ever I have to hand. Can't do much about the yellow one in the engine bay but it is fairly cool there.
 

Giles

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Feb 25, 2014
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fine to put on the floor if you just put a bit of wood on the concrete, and yes connect to any autonatic charger is the best thing to do

Chryler fit optima in engine bays but they are a way away from the engine and have a sort of jacket round them,,so it can be done its just best to fit somewhere cold
 

StarCruiser

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Sorry Giles I just had to look that one up as it didn't sit right with me. Apparently that theory stems from when car batteries were made from hard rubber which was porous and the concrete could make a connection across the cells when acid leached through. With today's plastic casings and valving and sealing avoiding any acid spills, there is no need. There is even the thought that the coolness actually helps maintain the charge by keeping cell temperature down.
 

dyladams

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Aug 15, 2011
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Stupid question Giles, but your purchasing guy didn't by any chance also make a mistake with some leisure batteries by any chance?
 

Giles

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Feb 25, 2014
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well i would not stake my life on the concrete theory being correct but from experience they do go flat on concrete and you will never see any product on the floor in any battery factory you should ever go to. so even if its not right i would recommend you stick them on a bit of wood just to be safe

yes we have a lot of leisure product and optima,,,,,if anybody ever wants to put the very best on anything then you will want North Star,,its expensive but if you are doing a dream build then that is what you should use, it charges at 3C (3 times it capacity)
 

Gary820

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Jan 8, 2013
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Cheaper then I can get a new battery for. Might have to order one for the 80. It was 2 years old when I bought it and stands a lot.
 

Towpack

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I don't think storing modern batteries on a concrete floor is an issue these days. The earth's surface itself is negatively charged as anything that is bonded to it will also be, so a concrete floor is no different to any other in this respect. Batteries will gradually self discharge no matter what you stand them on, the discharge rate being affected by temperature more than anything else. Before lead acid batteries were encased is tough durable plastic housings with excellent insulation properties various materials were used and some of these could be affected by the surface they were stood on. JMO
 

SteveS

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Jan 12, 2013
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thanks Chris

Concrete is negativly charged and batteries are positivly charged,,and i think the physics is basically everything tries to be neutral so they cancel each other out,,,sorry if i have offended any inteligent people out there with my shit explination

We import Optima directly from the Factory in Mexico and I think we are the only firm in the UK to do that,,but becarefful with Optima and any other AGM battery,,they don`t like heat so don`t put to close to engines as the little moisture in then will dry out and cause failure.

Giles
Giles - don't want to tell you your business - but found several articles on the concrete floor storage.....many seem to pour cold water on that with modern plastic encased batteries.....example below

~~~~~~~~~~~

Several folks have told me not to let batteries sit on concrete. Why is that? Is it because the cold concrete would cool the battery too much?
Steen Hvidd - Dolan Springs, Arizona
Your question is a frequent one. Many people have the impression that when batteries sit on concrete, energy "leaks out" or they are ruined. The short answer is that letting modern batteries sit on concrete does not harm or discharge them in any way.
However, this legend is historically based in fact. The first lead-acid batteries consisted of glass cells that were enclosed in tar-lined wooden boxes. A damp concrete floor could cause the wood to swell, breaking the glass inside.
The Edison cell (i.e. the nickel-iron battery) that preceded the rubber-cased battery was encased in steel. Those that weren't isolated in crates would discharge into concrete quite easily. Later battery cases used primitive hardened rubber, which was somewhat porous and could contain lots of carbon. A moist concrete floor combined with the carbon in the battery cases could create electrical current between the cells, discharging them.
None of this is a problem with modern batteries — safe in their hard plastic shells. In fact, concrete is generally an excellent surface on which to place a battery bank. The electrolyte in a battery sitting on an extremely cold floor with very hot air around it could stratify, causing damage from sulfation; whereas concrete provides good thermal mass to buffer any temporarily extreme temperatures in the battery compartment.
Energy can in fact "leak" out of battery banks — though in different ways. The first is from current between the battery terminals, caused by dirt, dust, and grime becoming carbonized (and therefore electrically conductive) from acid released from the cell. This is easily preventable. Use a clean rag to carefully clean the tops of the battery cases every time you perform your regular battery bank maintenance routine.
The second way happens to all batteries—it’s called "selfdischarge." Due to reactions within the plates, all lead-acid batteries will lose part of their charge over time. The warmer the battery compartment and the older the battery, the higher the self-discharge rate. An L-16 battery will lose 4% of its charge per week at 80 degF.
This brings us back to your original question, where you mentioned battery bank temperature. There are multiple electrochemical reactions going on inside any battery, all the time. Some are good (storing and releasing energy), and some are bad (self-discharge, sulfation). All of these reactions happen faster when the battery is hot, and slower when it's cold.
Cold temperatures don't damage lead-acid batteries unless the battery is heavily discharged and exposed to freezing temperatures. In that case, the electrolyte (which is mostly water when the battery is at a low state of charge) can freeze and crack the case. On the other hand, a fully charged battery can withstand -30 degF or lower without a problem.
However, since cold temperatures slow the desirable chemical reactions too, the amount of energy a battery can release at any given time is drastically reduced when the battery is very cold. That's why it's more difficult to start your car on a frigid morning. And it also takes more energy to charge a cold battery than a warm one — cold batteries are less efficient at both charging and discharging. At the end of the day, a good rule is that batteries like the same temperatures that humans do, between 60 degF and 80 degF.
 
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