Can I upgrade from the 92 to post 93 brakes...?

Lorin

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Mar 28, 2010
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Bournemouth
On a similar note, I just found a reference to 100 series pads fitting the 80 series brakes and providing a larger contact area with the disc - and hence better braking. Anyone else know about this or can confirm whether correct...?
 

Jon Wildsmith

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I am in england
Feb 24, 2010
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a few years ago now I bought a set of pre abs axles and the calipers off that were the same as on my 94 but if your source is good then double check because I haven't seen as many variations as some people. The 100 series pads fit on my 94 but I think they were a bit of a squeeze.
 

Julian Voelcker

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Mar 5, 2010
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OK, just to correct a few errors....

To upgrade the front brakes you need to replace the callipers (the latter ones have longer mounts) and the dust shield (part no 47781-60100 - £64.58 + VAT).

To upgrade the rear you keep the same callipers, but need to replace the rear backing plate and dust shield as well as all the handbrake bits.

If you have access to the parts second hand it is worth doing, otherwise I wouldn't bother, you would be better off just upgrading to better disks that are going to cool better - the bigger brakes use the same pads as the smaller ones, it's just that the bigger disks cool better.
 

pugwash

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I am in uk
Mar 1, 2010
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N Hampshire
ref 100 series pads they do fit on the front of the post 93 80 series brakes- it is a VERY tight fit in every direction- you need to be certain you can fully push the pistons home before fitting otherwise they won't go in. They overlip the outers side of the disc which means you don't get that annoying lip on the discs that you do with most pads.

What they don't do is give you better brakes- well not really- most people think bigger pads must be better- in reality a bigger pad means less pressure on the disc from the pad (same force bigger area, therefore reduction in psi), this is offset by the bigger area. What you do find is that it takes noticeably longer for the pads to overheat. Took my 80 to andorra and then 6 months later to the Atlas mountains- in Andorra the brakes overheated very very quickly (they had crappy 80 series pads), in Morocco (despite the increased temps) the brakes didn't overheat once partly because i was using 100 series pads, but partly also because i was using EBC pads (which work very well when hot)

Problem with using 100 series pads is that if you are using temp sesitive pads (as with EBC) then they take longer to warm up, which can be VERY disoncerting in the morning then you need a really really good prod to get them working properly!
 
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alankehoe

New Member
I am in ireland
Jul 24, 2013
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Avoca, Ireland
OK, just to correct a few errors....

To upgrade the front brakes you need to replace the callipers (the latter ones have longer mounts) and the dust shield (part no 47781-60100 - £64.58 + VAT).

To upgrade the rear you keep the same callipers, but need to replace the rear backing plate and dust shield as well as all the handbrake bits.

If you have access to the parts second hand it is worth doing, otherwise I wouldn't bother, you would be better off just upgrading to better disks that are going to cool better - the bigger brakes use the same pads as the smaller ones, it's just that the bigger disks cool better.
Sorry to revive an old thread but I just wanted to find out if this is true Ive been searching for info on upgrading the front brakes on my HDJ81 1992 model to the larger brakes on the newer 80 series. to the best of my knowledge all i can see that is needed for the job is callipers, disks and backing plates,
however i've been told all sorts of stories that I need to replace the swivel housing also to fit the new callipers can someone confirm if i need to change the swivel housing or not ? that makes the job a whole lot less desirable

another post on the subject: https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/hdj81-brake-upgrade-with-part-s-and-pics.379674/
 

Billy Williams

Active Member
Dec 2, 2016
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you will need the bigger calipers, hub carrier and backing plates on the front, on the rear bigger backing plates and discs calipers are the same.
 

Billy Williams

Active Member
Dec 2, 2016
85
22
8
The calipers are the same for old and new trucks. The newer ones just got bigger discs and the mounting points for the caliper moved further out giving the pads more leverage. On the front you would need swivel housings from the newer truck to bolt your calipers onto and for the rear you would need the backing plates. The rear backing plates may be the expensive part as a seller might only be willing to sell the whole casing.

If you haven't rebuilt the calipers I would do that first as you might be losing out from the pistons not moving freely. Even with the bigger discs and calipers further out the brakes are not great with big heavy wheels (tyre size makes a big difference) so before you go to a lot of trouble it might be worth getting a drive in a newer truck with the same size tyres as yours. My old 80 hated stopping :D
WRONG.. calipers are different, wider on the later trucks.
 

stumog

Well-Known Member
I am in england
Oct 3, 2012
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I have don't the front of mine.

All you need is discs calipers from a later one and backing plates if you want to keep them.

No hubs or anything else.
 

alankehoe

New Member
I am in ireland
Jul 24, 2013
8
0
1
Avoca, Ireland
It works I did it 3years ago....

No issues what so ever
Thanks @Billy Williams and @stumog. This is exactly the kind of conflict I have found in other sources I mean it either works or it doesnt. Might be worth noting I've no abs on my cruiser although I don't think that makes any difference here.

@stumog did you have to modify anything to make the larger callipers work with the existing housing ? And did the bigger brakes make a big difference ?
 

alankehoe

New Member
I am in ireland
Jul 24, 2013
8
0
1
Avoca, Ireland
Overhaul your calipers , buy new disks and change the fluid .

25 years ain't bad like
My brakes are down 25% since the last test (2016) I put this down to the new tyres 285/75 as aposed to standard at the last test. This is why I was thinking upgrading to larger disks / calipers might be my only option.

You think fluid and calipers rebuild will make such a difference I'm currently at 49% brake performance and need 55% for a pass
 

alankehoe

New Member
I am in ireland
Jul 24, 2013
8
0
1
Avoca, Ireland
most likely.. so your saying that a calliper rebuild and new fluid will make a substantial difference.. i've already new ish disks on the front so should be able to hold on to them
 

Shayne

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Feb 2, 2013
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All i'm saying is the brakes you have would pass the test if they were new .

60 front and 40 rear was how i learned to stay alive while riding a motorbike , the rear brakes are more important than anyone gives them credit for .
 

stumog

Well-Known Member
I am in england
Oct 3, 2012
3,502
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I changed mine as I had a sticky caliper.
The difference was amazing took some time to get used to the difference.

No extra work carried out this is just a bolt on mod.
 
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