Removing the Front Wings on a Land Cruiser 80 Series

ByronJ

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Removing the front wings of an 80 series is a straightforward, if somewhat fiddly, process. The biggest challenge is locating the fixings then coping with removing corroded bolts. The bolts are mainly 10mm (M6) and 12mm (M8) heads, I found a 3/8” socket set a bonus as some of the fittings are in tight spots. I would much prefer to do this job under cover, especially if you plan to go on and remove the inner wings.

My suggested approach is documented below:

Remove the windscreen wipers.

Remove the scuttle under the wipers by undoing the six screws and slide the scuttle forward to remove it, this will reveal the wing bolt hidden underneath. A 90 degree screwdriver makes this job easy (or even possible) without having to remove the bonnet.

IMG_2088.jpg


Remove the nut holding the aerial onto the wing.

Remove the centre grill. Two screws on the top, 3 along the middle of the grill.

Remove the trim on top of the headlight, two screws.

Remove the sidelight. One screw at the top then pull the whole fitting directly forward. The screw holding the sidelight in place is the rusty looking one to the far right (it's actually Moroccan dust not rust) . The one to its left is one of the headlight trim screws and the bolt above and to its left is one of the four holding the headlight in place. It will probably be hard to pull the sidelight forward as there is a location fitting as well but that is just an interference fit. Be patient it will move.

IMG_2096.jpg

Remove the indicator. Two screws on the indicator face..

Unbolt the headlight. Four bolts. Two bolts are in plain sight, one is behind the sidelight and one behind the indicator. You should be able to leave the washer pipe attached and just move the headlight a few inches away from the wing.

Remove the 5 bolts on the top of the wing, note that one locates a rubber stopper.

Remove the bolt hidden behind the door
IMG_1137_01.jpg

Remove three bolts at the front of the wing

Remove the mud flap. Three hex screws. You may need to replace the fixings if rusted badly.

Remove two bolts close to the side step at the underneath and rear of the wing. The bolts pass through a plastic spacer clipped to the wing.

Remove the nearby nut and bolt linking the wing to the inner wing.

Now remove the 5 bolts linking the outer and inner wing. These are the most likely to give trouble as the corresponding nut is held captive in a clip.

If the nut is turning within its plastic housing then you may have to cut the bolt off.
With all the fixings removed you will probably find the inner and outer wings are glued together along the arch where you just removed the last 5 bolts. I cut through this with a sharp knife and off came the outer wing.
DSC_2197.jpg

The five holes along the bottom arch of the wing are where it attaches to the inner wing

The inner wings look like this when fitted.

IMG_1702.jpg


And like this when removed.

IMG_1177.jpg


Corroded fittings excepted, It is a simply enough job to remove the inner wing as all fixings are in plain sight (if some are in tight spots). However there is a lot of stuff bolted to them (especially the passenger side) that has to be detached. This includes the bonnet stays so be prepared to tie the bonnet to the roof of your garage.
Refitting is pretty much the reverse of the above procedure. I used a sealant between the inner and outer wings rather than a bonding adhesive. Any damaged fixings I replaced with stainless in M6 and M8. Always handy to have some of them around…

Though perhaps it is not a job for the faint hearted as the car looks like this with both inner wings removed.

Passenger side

DSC_2192.jpg


Drivers side

DSC_2193.jpg
 
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ByronJ

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Rust most easily starts on the wings wherever there a fixing. There is a lot of stuff bolted to the inner wings and the fixing bolts protrude into the wheel arch. As these bolts have a sharp edge underseal does not adhere particularly well and once exposed the bolt begins to rust. This rust then works its way up the bolt and onto the wing.

It is well worth keeping an eye on these bolts where they protrude into the wheel arch and ensuring they are well protected from corrosion. And should you unbolt any fixing from an inner wing it would be good practice to re-apply under seal to the ends of the bolts protruding into the wheel arch once the fixing is re-attached.
 

StarCruiser

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Rust most easily starts on the wings wherever there a fixing. There is a lot of stuff bolted to the inner wings and the fixing bolts protrude into the wheel arch. As these bolts have a sharp edge underseal does not adhere particularly well and once exposed the bolt begins to rust. This rust then works its way up the bolt and onto the wing.

It is well worth keeping an eye on these bolts where they protrude into the wheel arch and ensuring they are well protected from corrosion. And should you unbolt any fixing from an inner wing it would be good practice to re-apply under seal to the ends of the bolts protruding into the wheel arch once the fixing is re-attached.
I was wondering if there was any benefit in using something like this- truck bed liner in the wheel arches?
https://www.ebay.co.uk/ulk/itm/331663730292
 

ByronJ

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StarCruiser

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frank rabbets

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Stourbridge
I might just take the outer driver wing off mine Then I can stick some sound deadener onto the inside of the wing chamber. There is a lot of intake noise in there I think ?
 

flint

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Has anyone had experience with this stuff at all? Bilt Hamber Dynax S-50 Anti-Corrosion Wax.
I did the underside of my Colorado with Dynax 50 last autumn. After a good cleaning off, I did quite a bit of patching on the sills and had to make up some new running board support brackets, any new metal got a few coats of their zinc spray. I sprayed the Dynax on with a pressurised undercoating gun and it took the best part of a 5 litre container to do all the underside, inside the sills and the chassis inside and out. I went over the more exposed parts, wheel arches etc. with a brushed on coat of the heavier UB underseal. So far it seems to be holding up pretty well, no flaking or signs of rust appearing. I did have to add a dash of white spirit and heat the Dynax up a bit to get it to spray nicely at 90 psi. The cans work pretty well, but it would take quite a few to do the whole job.
 
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Bert

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Thanks for this post Byron. I may entertain doing some work on the drivers side wing on mine at some point in the future. This post fills me with confidence..... well, some at least.
Cheers,
Simon
 

ByronJ

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I am in wales
Jul 7, 2012
349
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43
Burry Port
Thanks for this post Byron. I may entertain doing some work on the drivers side wing on mine at some point in the future. This post fills me with confidence..... well, some at least.
Cheers,
Simon
Cheers simon. Good luck and take plenty of clear photographs before you pull it all apart...
 
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