Replacement of standard battery set-up (100 Series)

thelostscott

Active Member
I am in new_zealand
Apr 19, 2012
50
0
16
West London
Hi all,

I need of recommendations for suppliers and battery types to replace the batteries in a standard engine bay set-up in my '98 100 series.

Knowledge in this area is limited so not really sure what to look out for.

Apologies for the vagueness and thanks in advance.
 

Steve Wright

Well-Known Member
I am in great_britain
Mar 4, 2010
345
30
48
Glossop
You need a pair of batteries with something like 249 and a 250 with opposite posts, I would say the biggest battery that fits, largest capacity and the most you can afford
I fitted a pair of Yuasa battery's a few years ago and they have been great
 

uHu

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in norway
Mar 7, 2010
2,037
397
83
Oslo, Norway
What Steve said.
If it's a standard HDJ100 with 2 batteries in parallell connection, they work as one unit, and it is important that the two are as equal as possible. Several manufacturers have matched pairs with opposite terminal locations, with a capacity of around 65 to 105 Ah. 90 to 95 Ah with a CCA of about 800 is standard.
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here

uHu

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in norway
Mar 7, 2010
2,037
397
83
Oslo, Norway
Looks good both of them. Haven't tried any tho'.
The Yuasa ones are calcium, which normally last a bit longer. They also require a slightly higher charge voltage to get to 100 %. I have my second pair of calcium now, and they do seem to keep a bit longer than the standard lead type. I have a charger mounted in the car, with a plug in the bumper, and plug into mains frequently, at least during the winter. The 1HD/FT/FTE is particularly hard on the batteries with the heating grid in the intake. If you disconnect it, the batteries last a couple of years longer. (As does the alternator)
 

Howmanygoes

Well-Known Member
I am in england
Jan 14, 2019
303
113
43
Looks good both of them. Haven't tried any tho'.
The Yuasa ones are calcium, which normally last a bit longer. They also require a slightly higher charge voltage to get to 100 %. I have my second pair of calcium now, and they do seem to keep a bit longer than the standard lead type. I have a charger mounted in the car, with a plug in the bumper, and plug into mains frequently, at least during the winter. The 1HD/FT/FTE is particularly hard on the batteries with the heating grid in the intake. If you disconnect it, the batteries last a couple of years longer. (As does the alternator)
@uHu what is the down side to disconnecting the heating grid?
 

uHu

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in norway
Mar 7, 2010
2,037
397
83
Oslo, Norway
There is no down side to disconnecting, at least not in temperatures warmer than minus 30 C.
It is supposed to give lower emissions during the first minute or so after starting a cold engine. That's it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Howmanygoes

br1anuk

Active Member
Jan 10, 2016
64
19
8
Ive just bought a pair of Yuasa batteries from eBay. Matched pair YBX5334 and YBX5335 for £148 including delivery. They're the silver ones with a five year guarantee. They're 95AH and bloody heavy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AndycruiserguyLomas

Indie

New Member
I am in uk
Sep 9, 2019
35
8
8
There is no down side to disconnecting, at least not in temperatures warmer than minus 30 C.
It is supposed to give lower emissions during the first minute or so after starting a cold engine. That's it.
I thought the heater grid was a type of replacement for glow plugs that the 100 doesn't have, any problems on freezing cold mornings in starting the engine ??
 

uHu

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in norway
Mar 7, 2010
2,037
397
83
Oslo, Norway
Never. Not needed.
There are two types of diesel engines traditionally: Those with indirect ignition and a glow plug, and those with direct ignition without a glow plug. The ones with glow plugs need the plugs to be glowing for combustion to start. After starting, the combustion will keep them glowing.
The direct ignition type (e.g. 1HD-FTE) always starts easily, whatever the temperature. It is normal to give a bit more fuel for starting at freezing temperatures, and that was done manually with a lever or something in the olden days (like on a 1960s Volvo bus). The heater grid is an environmental implement.
 
Last edited:

Indie

New Member
I am in uk
Sep 9, 2019
35
8
8
Never. Not needed.
There are two types of diesel engines traditionally: Those with indirect ignition and a glow plug, and those with direct ignition without a glow plug. The ones with glow plugs need the plugs to be glowing for combustion to start. After starting the combustion will keep them glowing.
The direct ignition type (e.g. 1HD-FTE) always starts easily, whatever the temperature. It is normal to give a bit more fuel for starting at freezing temperatures, and that was done manually with a lever or something in the olden days (like on a 1960s Volvo bus). The heater grid is an environmental implement.
Thanks UHU for the info, thats another piece of tech i can put in the bin.. must improve the airflow as well..
 

Indie

New Member
I am in uk
Sep 9, 2019
35
8
8
Thanks UHU for the info, thats another piece of tech i can put in the bin.. must improve the airflow as well..
Hi UHU, Ive removed the 8mm power cable from the heater grid and all is well as you advised, i now want to remove the cable from the battery but I've found what looks like a solenoid just behind the air filter where the cable from the grid terminates on a 6mm threaded post and then there is another cable running from another post on the solenoid to the battery. There are two small wires that also go into the solenoid. Is it ok to remove the solenoid and leave the two small wires unplugged i assume they are what switch the solenoid ? i will of course remove the cable going to the battery..

Many thanks
Graham..
 

uHu

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in norway
Mar 7, 2010
2,037
397
83
Oslo, Norway
I think that would be OK. I have only pulled the small plug for the control of the solenoid, and left the rest in place. Haven't had any problems with it for years now.
 

Howmanygoes

Well-Known Member
I am in england
Jan 14, 2019
303
113
43
Hi UHU, Ive removed the 8mm power cable from the heater grid and all is well as you advised, i now want to remove the cable from the battery but I've found what looks like a solenoid just behind the air filter where the cable from the grid terminates on a 6mm threaded post and then there is another cable running from another post on the solenoid to the battery. There are two small wires that also go into the solenoid. Is it ok to remove the solenoid and leave the two small wires unplugged i assume they are what switch the solenoid ? i will of course remove the cable going to the battery..

Many thanks
Graham..
Can you post a pic of what you unplugged and plan to do?
 

Indie

New Member
I am in uk
Sep 9, 2019
35
8
8
Can you post a pic of what you unplugged and plan to do?
Hi, Im not changing the battery set up but removing the power supply for the heater grid in the inlet system which as UHU states and i agree, serves no useful purpose on the 1HD-FTE. The solenoid is located just behind the air filter housing it has 2 x 8mm (approx) cables and 1 x small plug with 2 wires. The plan is to get rid of the heater grid to increase air flow and save the batteries. Then get rid of the EGR system and clean out the inlet manifold and associated pipework and install a Provent 200 Catch Tank to stop any oil from the engine breather getting into the inlet and intercooler. Ive had the heater grid disconnected for a while now and have just removed the solenoid with no issues.
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks