Which modifications will devalue an original BJ43?

KevinBJ43

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
22
Country Flag
sri_lanka
Hi Guys,

i have an original 1983 BJ43 with an original 1B engine and 4 speead gearbox. i want to replace the front diff cause the current diff needs an overhaul making engaging 4x4 risky so im planning on replacing it with that of a newer model cruiser because then i could also get disk break so its greater value for money as opposed to the cost of overhauling the diff and getting a disk break conversion separately. I also want to replace the gearbox with a reconditioned gearbox. basically ill be replacing my existing gearbox with the same gearbox but reconditioned. This is also more cost effective than overhauling the existing gearbox.

However, my biggest fear is that doing all that will devalue the vehicle but am i right to think so? the repairs ive planned will make the vehicle more drivable and safer too but ill be loosing the front diff and the transmission which my cruiser left the factory floor with. So is it better if i spend on rebuilding the existing front diff and tranny? or should i just do the replacements?

Thanks in advance!
Kevin
 

tintinmt

Active Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
50
Country Flag
uk
The only thing that adds value to a car is originality - discuss :grinning:
 

Shayne

Well-Known Member
Guru
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
13,605
If you plan to sell it to a museum original is best but if you plan to keep it forever then nothing that works for you devalues it .
 

Grimbo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2016
Messages
510
Country Flag
great_britain
Replace the parts you describe but keep the originals ....
That way if you sell it to someone that must have originality then they have the option of restoring it to as it left the factory ...
Better to have a useable vehicle and money to spend on doing other work.
To retain best value don't modify anything that can't be returned to stock .
 
Don't like the adverts?  Click here to remove them

Rodger

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Messages
1,350
Later axles tend to be wider. Somewhere I do have the measurements and I will try and find them for you. So you maybe be better finding another 40 axle and fitting a conversion to discs. From memory discs became standard in 84-5 but the Euro models (specific vin codes) had discs from '79.

Regards,

Rodger
 

KevinBJ43

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
22
Country Flag
sri_lanka
Hi Rodger, thats a good point. is it also safe to assume that the raw materials used to manufacture all the components are more superior in the 40s?
 

KevinBJ43

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
22
Country Flag
sri_lanka
Hi Grimbo, sounds like the safest way to go about it. also, just as there are chassis numbers and engine numbers specific to every 40 which enables one to authenticate it, are there similar codes/symbols which would enable someone to authenticate other components too such as the trany and the diffs? in my 40 ive noticed the daihatsu logo in most parts and housings. this i believe is because daihatsu was under toyota during that period. similarly are there any other indicators which one can look for to determine if every single part on a 40 is that which it left the factory floor with?
 

Rodger

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Messages
1,350
As far as I am aware there was no specific part codings, other than part number tags, aside from type/style as indicated on the vin plate (obviously other than engines being numbered). Both Daihatsu and Hino were, and maybe still are, sub-contractors to Toyota .
IMO there was no diminution of quality to later models but there was a separation between heavy duty models and lightweight models which first became apparent in the 70 series trucks. However the 60 series was deemed to be targeted at a less utilitarian market with more comfort built in. The real split was more identifiable with Prado being lightweight versions but even so they still had the inherent strength and quality incorporated, just more comfortable.

Regards,

Rodger
 
Top