do I ditch the split rims?

alexander May 15, 2018

  1. alexander

    alexander New Member Supporter I am in wales

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    I did a search but couldn't see a thread on this.
    My troopy has split rims, to be honest I never heard of them. So I've googled and read bad things, dangerous, fatalities etc. Scared the crap out of me!
    So do I ditch then now? I have no experience of them so is it worth learning now, or just go orthodox steels?
    Orrrr....alloys...or is that another question?
    Chehrs,
    Alex
     
  2. Julian T

    Julian T Well-Known Member

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    There are pro's and cons to every thing, I quite liked split rims for the ease of repairing punctures, if you know what you are doing and you have the correct tools they are not anymore dangerous than what are now considered normal rims, imo obviously.

    The disadvantage is that you can not use tubeless tyres as there is no way to seal them, by that I mean you have to have tubes which in turn means you should not run for extended periods of time with low air pressure as you may want to when off road or travelling on wash board roads.

    The main factor you need to consider is how are you planning to use the vehicle before you decide what rims and tires to fit.

    Something else to think about, if the split rim truly was as dangerous as it is made out to be it would have been banned by now surely.

    Just my opinion ;)
     
  3. denboy

    denboy Member

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    depends what sort of split rims they are - the later ones that are bolted together (Hutchinson) are fine... in fact very expensive....

    the steel type split rims - have a very bad write up - even tyre people handle pump ups of tyres in safety cages... look on u tube for examples.... a couple show how badly it can go wrong... but like everything in life - if done properly they are fine.
     
  4. alexander

    alexander New Member Supporter I am in wales

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    I need to understand how they work, and how to change a tire first hand I think. Then I'll know the pros and cons.
    Cheers.
     
  5. clivehorridge

    clivehorridge Well-Known Member Guru I am in romania

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    Maybe this will help...

     
  6. alexander

    alexander New Member Supporter I am in wales

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    No black magic then, simple stuff. Tempting to just carry spare tubes and a tire rather than two wheels?
     
  7. uHu

    uHu Well-Known Member I am in sri_lanka

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    Split rims are easier to change tyres on when you don't have a tyre machine handy, like when crossing Greenland or Inner Mongolia. As an example, I changed 20R11 tyres on my bus a few times, with only a few hand tools. My 1st cruiser had splits, and I never saw any problems with any of my 12 split rims. As long as the rings are put properly in place, you should be OK. Of course, if you are always staying in inhabited areas, alloys will be easier to handle.
     
  8. alexander

    alexander New Member Supporter I am in wales

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    I'm starting to appreciate the split rims now after watching the you tube videos and these comments. I like the idea of changing the tyres without fuss. I've read a safety pamphlet that recommends using a 3m long hose and standing far away when inflating which is sound advice. I can do that.
    I'll stick with the splits for a while and see if they work for me.
    Cheers.
     
    clivehorridge likes this.
  9. moggy1968

    moggy1968 Well-Known Member

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    I used them through West Africa and I’ve changed tyres by hand on them, but when I reinflate the tyre the wheel is under the vehicle so if the ring blows off it’ll be stopped by the chassis.
    Main problem was punctures, loads and loads of punctures.
    In these days if tubeless repair kits being able to change your own tyres isn’t that important, even if Africa your never far from a tyre fitter.

    If you do want to get rid I might be interested to have them for shows etc, so first dibs please.
     
  10. alexander

    alexander New Member Supporter I am in wales

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    Why the punctures? Having lots defeats the advantage? No need to split the rim if its not punctured?

    Shipping might be expensive from Peru.
     
    uHu likes this.
  11. moggy1968

    moggy1968 Well-Known Member

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    Rubbing on the tube, possibly rust. 12 punctures in 6000 miles, all tube failure, even with heavy duty Michelin tubes.
     
  12. moggy1968

    moggy1968 Well-Known Member

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    I was going by your uk avatar
     
  13. clivehorridge

    clivehorridge Well-Known Member Guru I am in romania

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    Punctures in tubes can be reduced with added care IMO.

    Check that the rims are free of abrasive rust where the tube sits, and free of grit and anything else that may chaff the tube. Not so easy on a desert crossing, but do your best...

    Dust the tube and the rim liberally with talcum powder (French Chalk) before and during fitting, it makes a big difference.

    Check for burrs in the steel of the rim and around the valve hole, past tyre fitters can be quite brutal sometimes with equipment or levers...

    Fit the tyre with a small amount of air in the tube to give it shape, its all too easy to trap a ‘flat bag” .... After tyre fitting, deflate that air to ensure that the tube is free to settle without stress upon inflation...

    The list goes on...
     
    StarCruiser and grantw like this.
  14. AndycruiserguyLomas

    AndycruiserguyLomas Well-Known Member I am in england

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    I wish I'd a pound for every split rim wheel Toyota ever made. I've run them in the past but they are very heavy and you do have to run them with tubes. Back in the day all HGV's had split rim wheels just bigger and before they went tubeless I changed tyres on hundreds over the years and never had one blow off. That said, I always blew them split rim to the floor or in a cage, ( just in case).
    Running them is up to you, I see no advantage to do so though. Alloys will weigh less than half and make the driving experience better, and give the brakes and suspension an easier time.
     
  15. moggy1968

    moggy1968 Well-Known Member

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    The Toyota splitties do weigh a ton, I mean properly bastard heavy (and I've changed lorry wheels before!)
    In addition to what clive has said, fit tyre flaps, they help to reduce abrasion. I think my problems mostly came from rust
    Picture 205.jpg Picture 206 cropped.jpg
     
    grantw, clivehorridge and uHu like this.
  16. alexander

    alexander New Member Supporter I am in wales

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    I've been thinking about those punctures. I can't see how Toyota would fit wheels that result in punctures. There must have been a reason such as rust or a damaged wheel.
    I think I'll invest in a bead breaker hammer and spare tubes and make sure the rims are not damaged
     
  17. moggy1968

    moggy1968 Well-Known Member

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    Read my post above
     
  18. leeloo

    leeloo New Member I am in romania

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    The main advantage of a modern tubeless AT tyre is the ability to handle low pressures for long periods of time, even 1 bar, or lower with ease ( talking about hundreds of kilometers ) This will help you to get out of bad situations, mud. sand, snow. without the need of winching very often, which is time consuming. Will make corrugation on gravel roads more bearable. For offroading it is probably the biggest and most significant progress since the 70's that improved a lot the ability of the vehicles and made life much easier for people going offroad.
    If you stay on the asphalt, no issues...
     
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