UK Insurance Ballpark Figures for City Dwellers?

Dave_S

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I tried both with and without the missus on there. Adding her only put another ~ £90 onto the quote. So not that much of a difference, really

The odd thing is, she's had her provisional licence for 21 years. She got it when she was younger so she could ride a 125 and she has a wee scooter now. But she's never had a car so never needed to take a driving test. I wonder if that's considered good? [as in has held a provisional licence for 20+ years] or bad? [as in has held a provisional licence for 20+ years but never passed a driving test]

TBH I doubt your wife's history on a provisional would count for anything, one way or another. A provisional license is just that - it is intended as a step to full legality - not a loop hope (as an aside, if you can safely ride a 125 for years, or drive a reliant 3 wheeler sensibly, why the hell wouldn't you take your test? Even a bike test, to ride a little scooter? Unless you aren't confident of passing, which reinforces the idea of compulsory CBT.... but anyway...).

Based on all you've said, Steve's comments seem sensible - i.e. mid to high hundreds, depending on what exactly you are buying. Pretty much all insurance underwriting is driven through algorithms now, based on a huge number of variables - post code is important both from the perspective of risk (of loss) but also risk of fraudulent claims (both of which impact inner cities, so its a double whammy). Few companies really do individual underwriting, though they will have a healthy "wriggle room" on their automated quotes, to facilitate the idea of negotiating.

I'd suggest you hit as many potential quote sites as you can, note the best and use this as a blunt instrument for negotiation. Worth noting that many of the "insurance companies" are nothing of the sort - they're mostly brokers - the same half a dozen companies underwrite most of this.
 

SteveJB

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More thoughts to reduce costs fit with stand alone fuel cut off valve a Tracker system there are a few companies that supply this service and I know smart water is more for bikes but if it cost ten quids and saves you twenty a year after you are quids in BUT unfortunately all these suggestions can only be done when you have your own truck when you are looking for quotes is there much more difference between a Colarado UK vehicle and a Prado Jap import for a press of a few buttons on your keyboard got to be worth some minutes of your time
 

stuzbot

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Well, the guy selling the Colorado I was watching on eBay didn't bother getting back to me when I asked him for some photos of the underside. So I'll not be bidding on that one.
when you are looking for quotes is there much more difference between a Colarado UK vehicle and a Prado Jap import...

Yes. Why is that? The last couple of quotes I got were for a UK model. I previously put in details of a Jap import and the quotes were much higher. How come? Same motor, same engine size, same spec [with the odd variation in interior optional extras] and RHD. Why the discrepancy?
 

Grimbo

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Well, the guy selling the Colorado I was watching on eBay didn't bother getting back to me when I asked him for some photos of the underside. So I'll not be bidding on that one.


Yes. Why is that? The last couple of quotes I got were for a UK model. I previously put in details of a Jap import and the quotes were much higher. How come? Same motor, same engine size, same spec [with the odd variation in interior optional extras] and RHD. Why the discrepancy?
Jap imports or Imports in general tend to be more to insure because the parts to repair are often slightly different and not available from UK dealers ....that always used to be the case.... but on a vehicle of that vintage would be unlikely to be repaired in event of a major damage incident so a bit of a moot point now .
 
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stuzbot

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Well, this is interesting. Given the dearth of Colorados / Prados about on eBay / Gumtree at the moment, I just stuck the details of a couple of mid-2000s LC5s into the insurance comparison sites and got back quotes that were actually a wee bit cheaper than the ones I'd been getting for the late 90s Colorados / Prados. It really is a roulette wheel, this insurance quote malarky. I'd not even bothered looking at the LC variants as I assumed that, if I was getting such high quotes for a 20+ year old Land Cruiser, then quotes for the newer, more high spec models would be even more eye-watering.

No wonder one of the comparison sites is called "confused.com"!

Oh well. At least this widens my options quite a bit now, as I hunt for a Land Cruiser. There are far more of the LCx ones about than there are Colorados / Prados. It's just a pity nearly everything seems to be an auto.
 

Grimbo

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I wouldn't get hung up on wanting a manual when looking at later vehicles....
I've got a manual 80 series and also for a while had an auto at the same time .... the auto was better off road and for towing and later autos are much better than the reliable but stone age auto fitted to most 80's .
My wife's Merc is a 7 speed auto and it's way better than a manual box .
Only reason I can see now for a manual is the fact you can tow or bump start it in remote area's if the battery dies.... in all other ways a modern auto is equal or better than a manual
 

stuzbot

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Well, I'm being gradually persuaded not to rule out an auto [which is probably just as well, as they seem to outnumber manuals by about 4 to 1 in the ads I'm seeing.

My main concern, [as discussed in another thread] is more to do with my having absolutely zero experience of autos. I've never even sat behind the wheel of one, much less driven one. So, shopping for an LC with an auto box, I'd be clueless as to whether or not it was doing what it's supposed to do properly, when I took it for a test drive. Whereas, with a manual, I can get a reasonable feel for the state of clutch and gearbox pretty quickly.

As I say though, I'm not as steadfastly opposed to the idea of an auto as I once was. Just a bit a'feared of the 'unknown factor.'.
 

Dave_S

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Best bet is just to get out there and drive a few (CV19 permitting). Autos should change up and down smoothly, drop a gear on kick down when you floor the accelerator, and hold on a moderate slope, facilitating pull away without handbrake if needs be. Ideally get it hot and work it on a long hill climb and watch for slipping or nasty smells. Personally I still prefer driving a manual (our 80 and Hilux are both manuals), but autos have their place (my DD Lexus is an auto and a lovely drive).

Oh, and if you're new to autos, you need to watch you don't accidentally try to use the (non-existant) clutch - and stomp on the brake pedal with your left foot by accident! If in doubt fold your left leg across the front of the seat, to remind you not to use it.
 
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