Uprated cvs or genuine

Gary820 Feb 11, 2018

  1. Gary820

    Gary820 Well-Known Member I am in great_britain

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    Quick one I suppose but are uprated cvs worth it or just stick with genuine?
    I've blown the passenger cv joint and no point fitting a cheap one!! It's lasted 85k miles lol. Not sure if I've damaged the shaft yet.
     
  2. Chris

    Chris Super Moderator Supporter I am in europe

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    I'd go genuine. Nothing wrong with upgrades but it's getting them that's the hard part. You have to import them and the cost is really the same. People say that they are softer and wear out with road use. I have never seen that officially confirmed. How do you make harder upgraded CVs that are softer and wear out? Over what mileage and what driving conditions. Just ease off the loud pedal a little eh?
     
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  3. Gary820

    Gary820 Well-Known Member I am in great_britain

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    Kind of what I thought but always worth asking, I'll have a wander next door tomorrow and see which child I need to sell. Might as well put a pair in tbh.

    It started knocking the other week after going up some snowy rock steps, it let go on the road today!!
     
  4. karl webster

    karl webster Land Cruiser Club sponsor Promoted Company Land Cruiser Club Promoted Company

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    Drop me a pm if you want gary.
    I can sort you some genuine ones out ;)
     
  5. Tommy345

    Tommy345 Well-Known Member I am in uk

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    Terrain Tamer do a CV Joint with a grease nipple in the end allowing you add fresh grease without stripping it down, witch In turn should increase the life of the CV joint.
     
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  6. nielsc

    nielsc Member I am in belgium

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    I’m thinking of buying the terrain tamer ones, or Spidan(GKN = OEM BMW, Mercedes,...) cv’s
    The genuine ones are just way too expensive :(
     
  7. Tommy345

    Tommy345 Well-Known Member I am in uk

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    The Terrain Tamer equipment really is good stuff.
     
  8. Gary820

    Gary820 Well-Known Member I am in great_britain

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    Well been to Toyota and as we know not cheap. But my mate has submitted a MLA loss avoidance case to Toyota :)
    As an example he did one last week for me on a 2000 model corolla for an airbag control unit. Part was £320 plus vat, I had it fitted for £170 all in.

    He said he'll let me know tomorrow.

    Waiting on a price from terrain tamer, the nitro gear one's are $850 plus shipping for a a pair of drive shafts/cvs.
    @clivehorridge aren't those what you use?
     
  9. clivehorridge

    clivehorridge Well-Known Member Guru I am in romania

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    Those are the ones that (one of them) recently failed Gary :cry:

    I was disappointed with them TBH, I knew I’d taken a gamble fitting them, but hoped for longer than 18-19 months... about 30k km, clearly not enough. I’m back to OEM now...

    Lessons learned as they say.
     
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  10. Gary820

    Gary820 Well-Known Member I am in great_britain

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    Not even worth considering then.

    I admit i do at times drive it hard so no real shock.
    Part time conversion needed or a block under the little pedal :lol:
     
  11. StarCruiser

    StarCruiser Well-Known Member Supporter Guru I am in uk

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    Have a search on here for part time conversions. I seem to remember serious handling issues and folks removing the conversion.
     
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  12. Gary820

    Gary820 Well-Known Member I am in great_britain

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    Bit of wood under the little pedal it is then lol.
     
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  13. StarCruiser

    StarCruiser Well-Known Member Supporter Guru I am in uk

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    I've got plenty, what size would you like? I can even do them cheaper than Toyota. :)
     
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  14. chapel gate

    chapel gate Well-Known Member Supporter I am in england

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    I dont get this tbh rich. The 80 was actually available part time in some regions from the factory..
    Ive drove halfway back from austria before with no rear prop and it drove fine.
     
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  15. clivehorridge

    clivehorridge Well-Known Member Guru I am in romania

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    Funny that, someone once accused me of having a heavy right foot... heaven forbid...:whistle:
     
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  16. Dave 2000

    Dave 2000 Well-Known Member Supporter I am in spain

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    The problem is not having a part-time conversion, the problem is driving a AWD and then suddenly converting it to RWD, the driver needs some time to accommodate the way the car now handles.

    I drove mine for years in AWD, after fitting the replacement gearbox I could not find the new front propshaft nuts and bolts I had put in a 'safe' place. So locked the centre differential and drove the 80 in RWD for a couple of days.

    Around town I did not notice any difference at all but when I took it out on the coast bypass road I noticed the difference immediately, bends I would take at my normal driving pace in the 80 having driven the same roads for 14 years, I found the front running wide (understeer), it was not dangerous and I reacted accordingly but, an inexperienced driver may panic and brake exacerbating the understeer and perhaps unable to avoid an accident.

    I am not saying I am a better driver than those that had a near miss or even crashed, what I am saying is I may drive 10 or 15 different cars a week, most nowadays FWD, the odd RWD and of course a number of AWD, at town speeds they all drive the same, but as speed increases they start to react differently to steering and braking inputs so experience is the key here.

    I have been involved in many discussions about one system versus another however, you cannot overturn the laws of gravity and AWD is king IMO.

    Regards

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
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  17. StarCruiser

    StarCruiser Well-Known Member Supporter Guru I am in uk

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    I've no experience of it Mike but I guess front wheel drive, taking it steady could be a whole lot different to rear wheel drive, not much weight on and a bit of eagerness to get home maybe? It's on here somewhere.
     
  18. Gary820

    Gary820 Well-Known Member I am in great_britain

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    I drive mainly rwd, followed by 4 wheel drive and some fwd nowadays. Don't like fwd anymore tbh and much prefer rwd.
     
  19. Chris

    Chris Super Moderator Supporter I am in europe

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    I had my 80 in RWD only for a couple of months. I was horrible and I dread to think what strain it could put on the drivetrain. It also hit the fuel economy byt a couple of MPG. People think that reducing the friction at the front by disconnecting is somehow going to improve MPG. The 80 system is beautifully balanced as we know. Personally I would not fwark with it.
     
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  20. Lorin

    Lorin Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is that stronger CVs are made of a softer compound that has a greater 'twisting' ability - they essentially twist a lot more before they break and require a greater torque loading to reach full twist (i.e. the break point). As a result, the compound is less resistant to long term wear. I have also not seen any actual evidence that they do indeed wear faster though...

    OEM CVs are a known entity and they are very, very good. They are both strong and durable. I don't think any of the cheaper offerings are really able to come close. I reckon if you run 35s or less and don't drive harshly off-road then OEM are likely the best option. There are now more than a few people on Ih8mud running 37-40" tyres on OEM CVs without issue. If you do 'hard' off-road or run 37s then the stronger CVs may start to make more sense.

    I can't comment on Nitro's offerings but if I wanted stronger CVs I'd go with RCV as a first choice or Longfield as a second choice. Both offer limited lifetime warranties.

    For those interested there's some good info here regarding Longfield's original testing of different CV strengths. http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/toyo...obby-longs-axle-breaking-machine-results.html
     
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